The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore will also launch 12 key initiatives, including a levy on sustainable aviation fuel and low-carbon electricity imports.

By Paul A. Davies, Farhana Sharmeen, Michael D. Green, James Bee, and Kevin Mak

The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) has launched the Singapore Sustainable Air Hub Blueprint (Blueprint) as part of its efforts to decarbonise Singapore’s aviation sector while enabling sustainable growth.

Background

The Blueprint aims to reduce domestic aviation emissions[i] from airport operations by 20% from 2019 levels (404ktCO2) in 2030 and achieve net zero domestic and international aviation emissions by 2050. This net zero goal aligns with both Singapore’s national climate target and the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s target for the global aviation industry. Alongside the Blueprint, CAAS will introduce 12 initiatives to decarbonise Singapore’s aviation sector and five enablers for the effective implementation of these decarbonisation initiatives. The initiatives will be implemented across three domains: airport, airline, and air traffic management.

The new rules would oblige companies to integrate their human rights and environmental impact into their management systems.

By Paul A. Davies, Michael D. Green, and James Bee

On December 14, 2023, the European Council (Council) and European Parliament (Parliament) reached provisional agreement on the Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive (CSDDD). The agreement follows an extensive negotiation processes, which began in June 2023, after the European Commission had initially proposed the CSDDD in February 2022.

The CSDDD’s key aim is to enhance the protection of the environment and human rights globally. The CSDDD as proposed will set obligations for companies regarding the actual and potential adverse impacts of their own operations, those of their subsidiaries, and those carried out by business partners, described as the “business chain of activities.” The CSDDD would also establish a requirement for large EU companies to adopt a plan to ensure that their business model and strategy are compatible with the Paris Agreement, i.e., including concrete targets and measures in line with limiting global warming to 1.5 °C.

The proposed CSDDD would establish rules on penalties and civil liability for infringements (although these will ultimately be set by Member States).

LIDW23 member-hosted event provided insights into current and future trends in the greenwashing space.

By Sophie J. Lamb KC and Aleksandra Dulska

Latham & Watkins recently hosted a panel discussion during London International Disputes Week on the topic of greenwashing and how English law continues to evolve and adapt in order to meet the needs of international businesses and other stakeholders engaging with this issue. The event provided a platform to explore:

(1) The key drivers of greenwashing complaints

(2) The challenges organisations face when trying to define and explain their sustainability plans (including against the backdrop of rapidly evolving reporting guidelines)

(3) The associated litigation trends as observed globally

The panel included the Honourable Mrs Justice Cockerill DBE (Commercial Court Judge, High Court), Sophie J. Lamb KC (Partner, Latham & Watkins), Adam Heppinstall KC (Barrister, Henderson Chambers), and Meghan Sheehan (Director and Head of ESG and Sustainability, Kekst CNC).

This blog post summarises the key themes of discussion that took place and provides interesting insights as to what may lie ahead.

The second version includes guidance on metrics and how companies can conduct dependency and impact evaluation.

By Paul A. DaviesMichael D. Green, Austin J. Pierce, and James Bee

On 28 June 2022, the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures (TNFD) released version 0.2 of its framework for nature-related risk and opportunity management and disclosure (the Framework). The announcement builds on the release of the first iteration in March 2022, which was broadly received positively by market participants in a public feedback process hosted on the TNFD website.

The TNFD was established to develop a risk management and disclosure framework for organisations to report and act on evolving nature-related risks, with the ultimate aim of supporting a shift in global financial flows away from nature-negative outcomes and toward nature-positive outcomes. As the name may suggest, the TNFD has based much of its fundamental structure, including many aspects of the core disclosure recommendations, on the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD). The TNFD hopes that the Framework will therefore have the market impact that the TCFD recommendations have had in the climate space, and provide a basis by which companies can represent their natural capital-linked risks and opportunities in a clear and comparable manner for investors.